About
COPD

Understanding COPD
(chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)

COPD is a chronic lung disease that includes chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both. COPD affects the lungs and causes reduced airflow, which makes it hard to breathe. It is also progressive, which means it worsens over time, but with treatment, symptoms may improve. Your doctor can tell you what treatment is right for you.

Millions of Americans are affected by COPD


Approximately 15 million adults in the US are diagnosed with COPD. It is estimated that millions more have it and don't even know it.


Cigarette smoking is the most common cause of COPD. Most people who have COPD smoke or used to smoke. It's possible to have COPD even if you have never smoked. Secondhand cigarette smoke can also be a cause of COPD. There are several other potential causes of COPD like:

How does COPD affect the lungs?

First, it is important to understand how the lungs work. When we breathe, air travels down the windpipe into the lungs and then into smaller airways (bronchial tubes). At the ends of these tubes, there are bunches of tiny elastic air sacs called alveoli, which expand when we breathe in and deflate when we breathe out. This is how the body transfers oxygen into the bloodstream and then releases carbon dioxide waste.

COPD disrupts the airflow in and out of your lungs and reduces your lung function. See some of the reasons below:

What are emphysema and chronic bronchitis?
COPD
can include emphysema, chronic bronchitis, or both. Either emphysema or chronic bronchitis may reduce lung function, resulting in COPD symptoms that can make it difficult to breathe.
Emphysema
is a disease that damages the air sacs and may damage the small airways in the lungs. This significantly reduces your ability to expel the normal amount of air from the lungs. This causes shortness of breath and prevents the lungs from delivering oxygen into the blood.
Chronic bronchitis
involves increased cough and mucus production caused by inflammation of the airways. Bronchitis is considered chronic (or long-term) if you cough and produce excess mucus most days for several months two years in a row.
How ANORO can help

The two long-acting bronchodilators, an anticholinergic and a long-acting beta2-adrenergic agonist (LABA), found in ANORO combine to treat airflow obstruction in patients with COPD, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Both medicines work together to relax smooth muscles around airways and open air passages in the lungs, making it easier to breathe.

Once-daily ANORO helps keep airways open to prevent COPD symptoms and helps you breathe better for a full 24 hours. Your results may vary.

Symptoms include wheezing, cough, chest tightness, and shortness of breath.

Once-daily ANORO is a prescription medicine used long term to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both, for better breathing. ANORO is not used to treat sudden COPD symptoms and won't replace a rescue inhaler. ANORO is not for asthma.

If you have COPD, ask your doctor if ANORO could be right for you.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR ANORO ELLIPTA

  • ANORO is only approved for use in COPD. ANORO is NOT approved for use in asthma.
  • People with asthma who take long-acting beta2-adrenergic agonist (LABA) medicines, such as vilanterol (one of the medicines in ANORO), have an increased risk of death from asthma problems. It is not known if LABA medicines increase the risk of death in people with COPD.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR ANORO ELLIPTA

  • ANORO is only approved for use in COPD. ANORO is NOT approved for use in asthma.
  • People with asthma who take long-acting beta2-adrenergic agonist (LABA) medicines, such as vilanterol (one of the medicines in ANORO), have an increased risk of death from asthma problems. It is not known if LABA medicines increase the risk of death in people with COPD.
  • Call your healthcare provider if breathing problems worsen over time while using ANORO.
  • Get emergency medical care if your breathing worsens quickly or if use of your rescue inhaler does not relieve your breathing problems.
  • Do not use ANORO to treat sudden breathing problems. Always have a rescue inhaler with you to treat sudden symptoms.
  • It is not known if ANORO is safe and effective in people with asthma.
  • Do not use ANORO if you have a severe allergy to milk proteins or any of the ingredients in ANORO. Ask your healthcare provider if you are not sure.
  • Do not use ANORO more often than prescribed.
  • Do not take ANORO with other medicines that contain a LABA or an anticholinergic for any reason. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take and about all of your health conditions.
  • ANORO can cause serious side effects, including:
    • sudden breathing problems immediately after inhaling your medicine. If you experience this, stop using ANORO and call your healthcare provider right away.
    • serious allergic reactions. Call your healthcare provider or get emergency medical care if you get any of the following symptoms:
      • rash
      • hives
      • swelling of your face, mouth, and tongue
      • breathing problems
    • effects on heart
      • increased blood pressure
      • a fast or irregular heartbeat, awareness of heartbeat
      • chest pain
    • effects on nervous system
      • tremor
      • nervousness
    • new or worsened eye problems, including acute narrow-angle glaucoma that can cause permanent loss of vision if not treated. Symptoms may include:
      • eye pain or discomfort
      • nausea or vomiting
      • blurred vision
      • seeing halos or bright colors around lights
      • red eyes

      If you have these symptoms, call your healthcare provider right away before taking another dose.
    • urinary retention. People who take ANORO may develop new or worse urinary retention. Symptoms may include:
      • difficulty urinating
      • painful urination
      • urinating frequently
      • urination in a weak stream or drips

      If you have these symptoms, stop taking ANORO and call your healthcare provider right away before taking another dose.
    • changes in laboratory blood levels, including high levels of blood sugar and low levels of potassium
  • Common side effects of ANORO include:
    • sore throat
    • sinus infection
    • lower respiratory infection
    • common cold symptoms
    • constipation
    • diarrhea
    • pain in your arms or legs
    • muscle spasms
    • neck pain
    • chest pain



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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.
You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.