FAQs

Using ANORO

  • Use ANORO exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to use it. Use 1 inhalation of ANORO 1 time each day. Use ANORO at the same time each day.

    Do not use ANORO more often than prescribed. Do not use ANORO unless your healthcare provider has taught you how to use the inhaler and you understand how to use it correctly.

    • Each inhaler of ANORO contains 30 doses, which equals a 30-day supply. That’s why your dose counter starts at 30.
    • ANORO contains 2 medicines. Inside the inhaler, these 2 medicines are packaged in separate strips that each contain 30 blisters. When you open the inhaler (and hear the click), the contents of 1 blister from each strip combine to form 1 dose of ANORO.
    • You may see the quantity of “60” mentioned in printouts about your prescription, but your inhaler provides 30 doses. The “60” refers to the number of blisters inside the inhaler, not the number of doses.
  • For instructions on how to use the ANORO ELLIPTA inhaler, please watch the video or read the Instructions for Use.

  • You may not taste or feel the medicine, even when you are using the inhaler correctly. Do not take another dose from the inhaler even if you do not feel or taste the medicine.

  • Store ANORO at room temperature between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C). Keep in a dry place away from heat and sunlight.

    Store ANORO in the unopened foil tray and only open when ready for use.

    Safely throw away ANORO in the trash 6 weeks after you open the foil tray or when the counter reads “0”, whichever comes first. Write the date you opened the tray on the label on the inhaler.

    Keep ANORO and all medicines out of the reach of children.

  • If you miss a dose of ANORO, take it as soon as you remember. Do not take more than 1 inhalation per day. Take your next dose at your usual time. Do not take 2 doses at 1 time.

  • If you take too much ANORO, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away if you have any unusual symptoms, such as worsening shortness of breath, chest pain, increased heart rate, or shakiness.

  • Do not stop using ANORO unless told to do so by your healthcare provider because your symptoms might get worse. Your healthcare provider will change your medicines as needed.

About ANORO

  • ANORO is a prescription medicine used long term (chronic) to treat people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic lung disease that includes chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both. ANORO is used as 1 inhalation 1 time each day to improve symptoms of COPD for better breathing and to reduce the number of flare-ups (the worsening of your COPD symptoms for several days). ANORO is not for the treatment of asthma. ANORO is not used to relieve sudden symptoms of COPD and will not replace a rescue inhaler.

  • No. ANORO is not used to treat sudden symptoms of COPD. Always have a rescue inhaler (an inhaled, short-acting bronchodilator) with you to treat sudden symptoms. If you do not have a rescue inhaler, contact your healthcare provider to have one prescribed for you.
  • Yes. ANORO has been studied in clinical trials vs SPIRIVA HANDIHALER in patients with COPD.

    ANORO contains 2 long-acting bronchodilators in 1 inhaler and is used long term as 1 inhalation, 1 time each day, to improve symptoms of COPD for better breathing and to reduce the number of flare-ups. ANORO is not for asthma. ANORO is not used to relieve sudden symptoms of COPD and won't replace a rescue inhaler.

    In clinical trials, ANORO significantly improved lung function versus SPIRIVA HANDIHALER in people with COPD.*

    *Results shown in 2 of 3 clinical trials. Individual results may vary. SPIRIVA contains 1 long-acting bronchodilator and is used to treat COPD and reduce COPD flare-ups. Each product has its own risks and benefits. Please see full Important Safety Information for ANORO ELLIPTA below.

  • Yes. ANORO has been studied in clinical trials versus ADVAIR DISKUS 250/50 in patients with COPD.

    ANORO contains 2 long-acting bronchodilators in 1 inhaler and is used long term as 1 inhalation, 1 time each day, to improve symptoms of COPD for better breathing and to reduce the number of flare-ups. ANORO is not for asthma. ANORO is not used to relieve sudden symptoms of COPD and won't replace a rescue inhaler.

    In 2 clinical trials, ANORO significantly improved lung function versus ADVAIR DISKUS 250/50 in people with COPD.

    Results shown in 2 clinical trials with ADVAIR DISKUS 250/50. Individual results may vary. ADVAIR contains an inhaled corticosteroid and a long-acting bronchodilator, and it is used to treat COPD and reduce COPD flare-ups. Each product has its own risks and benefits.

  • ANORO is only approved for use in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    ANORO is not for the treatment of asthma. It is not known if ANORO is safe and effective in people with asthma.

  • Common side effects of ANORO include:

    • Sore throat
    • Sinus infection
    • Lower respiratory infection
    • Common cold symptoms
    • Constipation
    • Diarrhea
    • Pain in your arms or legs
    • Muscle spasms
    • Neck pain
    • Chest pain

    These are not all the side effects with ANORO. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

    Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

About COPD

  • COPD is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a chronic lung disease that includes chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both. COPD is a condition that worsens over time, making it hard to breathe. Learn more about COPD.

  • Reduced lung function due to COPD can result in 1 or more of these COPD symptoms: shortness of breath, cough, wheezing, and chest tightness. COPD is a progressive disease. Over time, most people with COPD develop many of these symptoms, although they may develop slowly.

  • Cigarette smoking is the most common cause of COPD. Most people who have COPD smoke or used to smoke, though it’s possible to have COPD even if you have never smoked. Secondhand cigarette smoke can also be a cause of COPD. There are several other potential causes of COPD, such as: dust, chemical fumes at work and at home, outdoor air pollution, indoor air quality, respiratory infections, and genetic factors.

  • When we breathe, air travels down the windpipe into the lungs and then into smaller airways called bronchial tubes. At the ends of these tubes, there are bunches of tiny elastic air sacs called alveoli, which expand when we breathe in and deflate when we breathe out. COPD disrupts air flow and reduces lung function.

    In COPD, airways that are damaged have walls that become thick and inflamed with mucus that can clog them, along with air sacs that lose elasticity. In comparison, healthy airways allow air to come in more freely and air sacs to expand more easily.

  • COPD can include emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

    Emphysema is a disease that damages the air sacs and may damage the small airways in the lungs. This significantly reduces your ability to expel the normal amount of air from the lungs, which causes shortness of breath and prevents the lungs from delivering oxygen into the blood.

    Chronic bronchitis involves increased cough and mucus production caused by inflammation of the airways. Bronchitis is considered chronic (or long-term) if you cough and produce excess mucus most days for several months during 2 years in a row.

Support

  • Yes. You may be eligible to pay no more than $10 a month on your 30-day prescription for up to 12 months. To find out if you qualify, read the Eligibility Requirements.

  • The amount you pay for ANORO will largely depend on your prescription drug insurance plan. To learn more, visit ANORO Pricing Information. To better understand your out-of-pocket cost, contact your insurance provider, as they know the details of your plan.

  • American Lung Association

    The American Lung Association website offers information about lung health education and research, as well as programs and services for people living with conditions such as COPD.

    COPD Foundation

    A not-for-profit organization created in 2004, the COPD Foundation supports research, education, and advocacy programs. Its website offers an online community for patients and caregivers affected by COPD, as well as information on the disease and a calendar of relevant events.

    National Emphysema Foundation

    The National Emphysema Foundation website provides regularly updated news and information on research and treatments related to emphysema and COPD. Its archives include articles on prevention, living with COPD, and healthy habits.

    U.S. COPD Coalition

    The U.S. COPD Coalition is a nonprofit organization that brings together patient foundations and organizations, health professional organizations, individuals, and government agencies to work in a unified manner to promote the interests of individuals affected by COPD. Every day, the U.S. COPD Coalition works toward its vision of a COPD-free United States.

Ask your doctor

Use this helpful discussion guide when talking to your doctor or healthcare professional.

DISCUSSION GUIDE

Savings offer

Pay no more than $10 a month on your prescription for ANORO for up to 12 months. Subject to eligibility. Restrictions apply.

SEE SAVINGS OFFER